Random Third Reich Images & Discussion

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been-there
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Re: Random Third Reich Images

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Last edited by been-there on Mon May 28, 2018 11:57 am, edited 1 time in total.


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been-there
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Re: Random Third Reich Images

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Soldiers ('Nazis'), flower, kitten.


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Soldiers ('Nazis'), music, merriment.


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Soldiers ('Nazis'), Sophie Scholl, merriment.


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Soldiers ('Nazis'), injuries, prosthetics.
Last edited by been-there on Mon May 28, 2018 11:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Random Third Reich Images

Post by Aryan Scholar »

Look, normal people, smiling, alive, even when struggling behind wired fences in concentration camps. What sad world is the fantasies of Holocaust believers where the only images they have to offer is of examples of human corpses followed by deranged descriptions of fictional ritual sacrifices over and over and over.

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Re: Random Third Reich Images

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Re: Random Third Reich Images

Post by Depth Check »

Gentlemen, this is a Third Reich Images topic. Please do not upload post war photographs of concentration camp inmates here.

Thank you.

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Re: Random Third Reich Images

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Date: Tuesday, 25th July 1944.
Place: Führerhauptquartier Wolfsschanze, Rastenburg, East Prussia, Germany
Photographer: Walter Frentz

Hauptmann Wilhelm "Willi" Batz (21 May 1916 - 11 September 1988) after receiving an award from Adolf Hitler with two other Luftwaffe officers.
He received the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (vorschlagnummer 526) for his remarkable achievement as a fighter pilot with 188 confirmed victories.

At that time he was a Gruppenkommandeur of III.Gruppe / Jagdgeschwader 52 (JG 52) / VIII.Fliegerkorps / Luftflotte 4.

By the end of the war, Batz had flown 445 combat missions and claimed 237 enemy aircraft shot down. 234 of these victories were achieved over the Eastern Front, including at least 46 Il-2 Sturmoviks.

He also claimed three victories against the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) over the Ploieşti oil fields including one four-engine bomber.
He was wounded three times and was shot down four times. At the war’s end he was able to return with his unit and men to Germany to surrender to American forces. He was thus able to avoid the prolonged Soviet captivity that befell the personnel of two other JG 52 Gruppen.
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Re: Random Third Reich Images

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"Pride in one's own race – and that does not imply contempt for other races – is also a normal and healthy sentiment. I have never regarded the Chinese or the Japanese as being inferior to ourselves. They belong to ancient civilizations, and I admit freely that their past history is superior to our own. They have the right to be proud of their past, just as we have the right to be proud of the civilization to which we belong. Indeed, I believe the more steadfast the Chinese and the Japanese remain in their pride of race, the easier I shall find it to get on with them."

--Adolf Hitler
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

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Re: Random Third Reich Images & Discussion

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During World War I, commanders often lost control of units once they set an offensive in motion. What communication was maintained was achieved by runners. Hitler famously served as one. Runners were vitally important to military communications before telecommunications replaced them. And that was why runners of the enemy were regarded as an important target to be eliminated. Thus they faced one of the most dangerous jobs: having to leave the safety of a trench, bunker or other shelter, and carry messages to other positions and return to confirm delivery. That is why runners were frequently decorated for bravery. Its also the reason why Adolf Hitler's exemplary and consistent bravery over a long period was awarded the Iron Cross First Class, normally reserved for officers only, despite him not being an officer.

The much vaster expanse of World War II battelfields, as well as the nature of its mobile warfare on land, air and sea was made possible by use of radio messaging.
Blitzkrieg warfare — devised by Sir Basil Liddel-Hart and yet ignored by British military high command but embraced by Hitler and the Wehrmacht — was made possible, succesful and controllable by radio communications.

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The principle behind radio transmission is simple. Electrons moving through a wire create a magnetic field. Place another wire near the first and electrons will start to move in the second wire too. The signal travels between the wires because the magnetic field formed by the first wire—the transmitter—creates an electric field in space, which in turn creates a magnetic field, and so on, moving outward at the speed of light. When the second wire — the receiver — picks up that signal, the field is converted back into the motion of electrons, detectable as an electric current. In order to carry information, the transmitted signal has to vary over time. The easiest way to do this is simply to stop and start the current in the first wire, sending a message as a series of pulses.
The flamboyant Serbian-born engineer Nikola Tesla followed that approach and transmitted a radio signal across a short distance in 1893.
Soon after, Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi accidentally discovered that grounded antennas could send signals more than a mile instead of a few hundred yards. He had inadvertently been using Earth to propagate a radio signal close to the ground. With further refinements, he found a way for ships to talk to each other using Morse code — the quintessential pulsed signal — and in 1896, just 21, he traveled to England and set up a radio company, British Marconi.

World events quickly proved the value of this work. In 1905 the Japanese navy all but destroyed the Russian fleet at the Battle of Tsushima, in part because of radio equipment the Japanese bought from Marconi.

The next big step was finding a way to manipulate radio waves so they could carry more than dots and dashes. Switching from pulses to continuous waves provided the key. Reginald Fessenden, a Canadian auto­didact, invented a way to transmit voice and music by altering the intensity of waves—called amplitude modulation—thus creating AM radio. (Amplitude modulation superimposes a varying audio wave onto a radio wave with a fixed frequency: Where the audio wave peaks, the modulated radio wave is at its highest intensity, and where the audio wave has a trough, the radio wave is at its lowest intensity.)

Military use of radio communications may have begun at Tsushima, but after World War I it expanded enormously. Governments started to understand radio’s immense potential, not only for communications but also as a weapon: radio detecting and ranging, better known as radar.
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Re: Random Third Reich Images & Discussion

Post by Scott »

Hello all,

I expect that Depth Check will get to this matter when he has time and probably move some posts.

I rarely get involved in moderation issues, but this thread was started by Lammers--and if Lammers wants "Random Third Reich Images & Discussion" for Lounge chat WITHOUT atrocity photos and off-topic discussions like Kristalnacht, that is his prerogative.

If you want to post atrocity photos and discuss things like Kristalnacht--or Walpurgisnacht, or whatever--then start your own thread(s).

Thank you.

:)

“Now we have forced Hitler to war so he no longer can peacefully annihilate one piece of the Treaty of Versailles after the other.”
~ Major General J.F.C. Fuller,
historian – England

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Re: Random Third Reich Images & Discussion

Post by Depth Check »

Sorry for the delay in dealing with this issue, Lammers. Living in the real world and having to work for a living can often get in the way of efficient and timely moderating.

A new Kristallnacht topic with posts removed from this thread can now be found here .

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