Aspects of Hitler's personal life

The RODOH Lounge is a place for general discussion, preferably non-Holocaust. The Lounge is only lightly moderated but please keep this a friendly place to chat with and get to know your fellow board participants.
User avatar
been-there
Propositions Moderator
Posts: 9228
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:59 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by been-there »

.
Image
Harald Quant with his mother Magda Goebbels

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=you ... JunFsPTGDg

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=you ... 60OdbR7vxg

The last letter Magda Goebbels (formerly Frau Quant) sent to her son Harald from her first marriage.

Image
Image

Image
Image
been-there wrote:
Tue Jul 31, 2018 11:12 am
2005 interview with Rochus Misch,translated from German:

[Minister of Propaganda Dr. Joseph] Goebbels and the kids arrived suddenly about 14 days before the end. Then Hitler's doctor, Dr. Morell, had to move out so that Goebbels could move in, and his wife lived one story higher, in the adjoining bunker, with the children. But the children came down to play all the time, you know? But when they were too loud we sent them back up. [Laughs.] Usually they were up in the New Chancellery; there were people around up there and they had freedom to move about.

I went up there too, shortly before the end, because the big kitchen was there. Goebbels sat down at a long table with the children. A young man played the harmonica. And Goebbels was saying goodbye to the civilians, with the children; there were so many people there in the New Chancellery, people looking to take shelter there. And it occurred to me for the first time that maybe I should say goodbye, too. That was the moment it became clear to me that Hitler and Goebbels would stay. And Eva Braun and Frau Goebbels had agreed they wouldn't abandon their men either, stay to the end, too. And then plans were made for the children. The other women in the bunker all offered — Frau Rindell for example, from the office, she said, "Frau Goebbels, if you want to stay here, that's your business, but the children can't possibly stay here..." and Frau Bruns said, "I'll take them to Arnbruck to my sister, as she can't have children — she would be happy. Please!" and she cried.

You know, we, the service people, we all knew that the children were meant to stay, and what would happen. They would stay and they would die.

Oh, and then of course the aviator, Hanna Reitsch, offered to fly them out as well. She said even if she had to fly back and forth 20 times, she would fly them out. Of course, that's not what happened.

Frau Goebbels, she had to come down to my room to get the children ready [administer the cyanide]. Up above there were so many people around, but down in our rooms there was no one. We ourselves weren't even down there. We only slept there. So she could take care of them on her own. I went out of the room and waited outside. Then Dr. Naumann came out of the room and said to me, he whispered in my ear, that if it had been up to him — he meant Dr. Goebbels — then the children wouldn't still be in the bunker, they would be evacuated. And I had seen Naumann with Goebbels up above, and he was probably right. I took him as a trustworthy representative. Goebbels didn't want it. It was Frau Goebbels who did. One must stick with the truth. That's how it was.

The film ['Downfall'] suggests both parents colluded to kill their children — misrepresented, in your opinion?

It's all Americanized. That's how the Americans want to see things...

But what about here in Germany? The film was made in Germany for Germans, by Germans, wasn't it?

Oh, the Germans have no idea about anything, either. If I had been in the New Chancellery instead of in the bunker, I wouldn't have any idea either, how that happened with the Goebbels children, how they killed the six children.

How do you think about the recent developments in Germany, the mainstream attempt to come to terms with the Holocaust and on the other hand the modest rise in neo-Nazism since the fall of the Wall?

Next to the site of the bunker they're putting up the big memorial. [The colossal central Berlin Memorial to the Jews of Europe, designed by American architect Peter Eisenman and composed of 2,700 concrete slabs, opens in May 2005.] Two thousand seven hundred concrete blocks; they're allowed that. But I say, how would it be if over there around the corner by the bunker, we put in six blocks, just six? The children of Goebbels were... killed. Couldn't they be honoured, the children? It won't do them any good now, but at the very least we could honour them, put up a sign that says here died six... children. Two thousand seven hundred, but six children can't be honoured?
been-there wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:52 pm
Hermann Esser wrote:
There was still another relationship with a woman during this time: Hitler’s intense involvement with Magda Quandt [who later married Joesph Goebbels]. Even before Geli’s passing (September 18, 1931), it seemed to most of us that Hitler was having a love affair with Magda Quandt. At the time she was having a clandestine relationship with Joseph Goebbels as well. Only those in the highest circles of the Party knew about their particular love affair.

Image

Whether Hitler didn’t know that Frau Quandt was Goebbels’ lover or whether he didn’t care, he behaved around her like a man who had conquered her. She returned his adoration tenfold and made no secrecy of her feelings for him. Sometimes it verged on the embarrassing. Frequently when meeting him, her complexion would turn from pink to flaming red. Hitler’s face would also blush crimson. It was as if they were both sharing a delicious secret.

Image

Hitler and Frau Quandt both behaved like they were two people in love, almost giggling with their feelings. This went on even in the presence of Joseph Goebbels, who no doubt was deeply embarrassed that his lady friend was ignoring him so openly.
Whenever I saw Frau Quandt and Hitler together during this period, it seemed obvious to me they had become intimate in every sense of the word. There was a palpable electricity between them. I might add, I never saw this occurrence with Hitler and any other women. Never.

Image

Whether their “friendship” continued after she married Goebbels, I don’t know. The evidence for it is lacking...

ImageImage

I have one story about Hitler and Magda Goebbels that I can divulge. This was in the Spring of 1933 at Hitler’s mountain home, Haus Wachenfeld. The Goebbels couple, myself, Eva Braun and Jakob Werlin were the only people present that weekend.

I will never forget a glance that passed between Hitler and Magda Goebbels during that stay. It was a gaze that expressed a powerful attraction, remembrance and longing. They were standing on the porch partially turned towards me. Neither knew I was watching them. Frau Goebbels was a petite woman and I saw as she stood on her toes to whisper something to Hitler. He did not move away from her, but clearly moved towards her as she rested her forehead against his cheek.

After she had finished whispering into his ear, Hitler put both his hands on her shoulders. That was when I saw the explosive look they exchanged. I certainly never saw Magda Goebbels look that way towards her husband, whom she seemed to passively dislike. It was fortunate that Eva Braun did not witness this exchange, for her jealousy was that of a tigress watching over her cubs.

Excerpt taken from Adolf Hitler, der Grosse Liebhaber by Hermann Esser,
Revue magazine, November 1 and November 8, 1949. Translation by Putschgirl.


Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Image


Would you like to financially contribute to the upkeep of RODOH, kindly contact Scott Smith. All contributions are welcome!


User avatar
been-there
Propositions Moderator
Posts: 9228
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:59 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by been-there »

Image
Erna Flegel: "Hitler's authority was extraordinary. He was always polite and charming. There was really nothing to object to."

The following is an interview conducted by a journalist in 2005 of Erna Flegel (11th July 1911 – 16th February 2006) who worked as a nurse during WW2 and was in the Bunker with Hitler and his entourage up to his death and remained there for over a week afterwards.

From January 1943 until the end of World War II, she worked alongside one of Hitler's physicians, Dr. Werner Haase, as a nurse at Humboldt University Hospital and was transferred by the Red Cross to the Reich Chancellery in late April 1945. She worked in an emergency casualty station located in the large Reich Chancellery cellar, near the Vorbunker and Führerbunker.

During her time in the Führerbunker she befriended Magda Goebbels and sometimes acted as a nanny to the Goebbels children until their deaths. Hitler once thanked her, Dr. Haase and Dr. Ernst-Günther Schenck for their emergency medical services for wounded German soldiers and civilians.

After Hitler's death Flegel worked at the emergency casualty station, until taken prisoner by the Soviet Red Army on 2nd May. Dr. Haase, Helmut Kunz and a fellow nurse, Liselotte Chervinska, were captured with her at that time. Flegel stated she stayed in the bunker complex another six to ten days before leaving. Later she was interrogated by the Americans and lived in anonymity until 1977, when documents including her interrogation were declassified. The media later tracked her down to her residence, a nursing home in Germany. She died in Mölln in 2006, aged 94.
Image

JOURNALIST: Frau Flegel, you were in Hitler's bunker at the end of the second world war?

Flegel: Yes. I was in the bunker when the war ended in 1945. I was working at the university clinic (in Berlin's Ziegelstrasse) and was transported from the clinic by car to the Reichs Chancellery. Towards the end we were always there. We lived there.

JOURNALIST: How did you get the job?

Flegel: I was working as a nurse on the eastern front. One day an order came through... and the head sister said would I be interested, there was a post free in the Reichs Chancellery. I said yes. We were used, when there was an order, to carry it out. If I did the opposite, well... I thought I could do something in the Reichs Chancellery. I went there and had a look. It was beautiful. And that how I ended up there. Later I had my own apartment. It was very agreeable. But then (as the Russians approached) the circle got increasingly smaller. People were pushed together and lived more unassumingly. I was sharing a room with another nurse.

JOURNALIST: You met Magda Goebbels, the wife of the Nazi propaganda minister, in the bunker. What did you think of her?

Flegel: She was a very intelligent woman, on a higher level than most people... She was married before and decided one day that it wasn't working, that it had become boring, and so she separated from her first husband. Then came the second marriage. It's hard to say from the outside that it was happier [than the first]. Goebbels enjoyed many affairs to the full. I don't know details. That was all gossip and trash.

JOURNALIST: What were the Goebbels children like?

Flegel: The Goebbels children were charming. Each one of them was absolutely delightful...

JOURNALIST: Did you try and persuade Frau Goebbels not to kill her own children?

Flegel: You have to understand that we were living outside normal reality. I wanted her to at least take one or two children out of Berlin. But Frau Goebbels told me: 'The children belong to me.' But I still didn't understand how she could kill six children.
Generally, Frau Goebbels looked after the children. But one evening she said to me: 'I have to go to the dentist and can't be with them, and I would like you to [put them to bed for me]. I said: 'Of course. I'll do it. Don't worry.' In the room where the Goebbels children were sleeping there were two bunk beds, one on top of another. The children had a piece of string attached to their beds, and if they wanted something they just had to pull it. The kids were so charming. They played with each other. They should have been allowed to live. They had nothing to do with what was going on. It was impossible. But she (Frau Goebbels) didn't want it. She said: 'I belong to my husband and the children belong to me.'

JOURNALIST: What did you think of Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's propaganda chief, who moved with his family into the bunker on April 20 1945?

Flegel: ...There were always people who hung around him, of course, relatives and so on, but they were only there because they wanted to help their careers. There were also lots of women there who were young and pretty. They used to hang round his ministry. They had an easier time of it than the rest of us, for whom things were more difficult.

JOURNALIST: When did you first meet Hitler, who stayed in Berlin from November 1944? What was your impression of him?

Flegel: I was in the house (the Reichs Chancellery) and then someone said: 'The Führer is here.' Well, please. It didn't particularly affect me then. That was the first time. Then the Führer was away for a long time from Berlin. Suddenly, he was back. Someone said: 'The Führer is in the building.' That was an experience. Everyone was discussing it. Hitler then shook hands with all the people he hadn't greeted before. It was very interesting. Obviously this wasn't a (formal) meeting.
After this he talked to us regularly, and not just about the weather. They were very interesting discussions but not in a substantial sense.

JOURNALIST: Can you describe the mood in the Bunker in the days leading up to Hitler's death?

Flegel: In the last few days Hitler sank into himself. Everybody has their own style, either negative or positive.

JOURNALIST: In your interrogation you describe how Hitler said farewell to his medical staff on the evening of April 29 1945, just before his suicide. What happened?

Flegel: He came out of the side-room, shook everyone's hand, and said a few friendly words. And that was it. There were a few people who then heard it [the shot, when Hitler killed himself the next afternoon] and there were others who didn't. The Führer suddenly wasn't there any more. The staff then decided whether to stay or not stay. I knew that the Führer was dead. Suddenly there were more doctors in the bunker, including Professor (Werner) Haase (one of Hitler's doctors). I didn't see Hitler's body. It was taken up to the garden. The Führer had such an authority that when he was there you knew it. It felt so extraordinary.
He was so informal. He would talk to you quite normally.

JOURNALIST: What happened next?

Flegel: Word spread that Hitler was dead. That meant that people no longer had to follow the oath of loyalty they had sworn to him.

JOURNALIST: Did you think you would leave the Bunker alive?

Flegel: We simply didn't think about it. We knew, naturally, who had the say, who was in charge, and couldn't talk about it. The soldiers gradually left. Suddenly they were gone. Afterwards many of us went to the U-Bahn in the hope that when they got there they could escape even if they met the Russians. Everybody was trying as bravely as they could to get out of this bedlam intact. And then it was finished.

JOURNALIST: After Hitler's death you stayed behind. What happened?

Flegel: We knew the Russians were approaching. As we were in the bunker a (nursing) sister phoned up and said: 'The Russians are coming'. Then they turned up in the Reichs Chancellery. It was a huge building complex. The Germans were transported away and we were left. The Russians treated us very humanely. They came to the entrance and we negotiated with them. First of all they sent someone to talk to us and to have a look round. By this stage there were only six or seven of us left, not more. They looked here and there. They (the Russians) were selected personnel and they behaved quite decently. They found everything stored downstairs. Anyone who needed anything went downstairs. The Russians respected this. The Germans were no longer responsible for anything. It worked. I stayed in the bunker for another six to ten days.

JOURNALIST: After the war, in November 1945, US intelligence officers interviewed you about your time in the bunker. Do you remember much about the interview?

Flegel: They invited us to have dinner with them and treated us to six different courses in order to soften us up. It didn't work with me, though. They tried to soften us up with exquisite food. I did have a couple of meals with them.

JOURNALIST: Why did you choose to remain silent for 60 years about your experiences?

Flegel: It was because after 1945 people started pointing fingers at each other and suggested that so and so was infected. There were a great many people who didn't say anything. And after that it remained a source of controversy. I didn't discuss it with my family. While I was in the bunker I had no idea whether my parents were alive or dead. In fact, they both survived the war. We were just glad to have survived.

JOURNALIST: Do you regret your role in the Third Reich? Or was this an exciting period for you?

Flegel: It's difficult when you have a society and it's discussed afterwards by the left or the right. Often it's seen wrongly. Everyone has their own opinion.
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

User avatar
Mark Caine
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2012 2:13 pm
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by Mark Caine »

Thank you been-there, I enjoy reading each new installment to this topic very much.

User avatar
been-there
Propositions Moderator
Posts: 9228
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:59 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by been-there »

.
An introduction — plus German-to-English translation — by a blogger calling herself 'putschgirl' of a 1949 article written by Hermann Esser .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
putschgirl wrote:The following article was written in 1949 by Hermann Esser (1900-1981), a co-founder of the Nazi Party and an intimate personal friend of Adolf Hitler for two decades. They met in 1920, thirteen years before Hitler assumed power in Germany. Esser was very close to Hitler in the early days of the National Socialist party. He was the first editor of the Nazi newspaper, its first propaganda minister and was designated as Hitlers deputy.

[Still] today, hundreds of articles appear each year in which Hitler’s sexuality is dissected. It has been (ludicrously) claimed that he was gay, impotent, a pervert, a virgin, asexual or any number of inanities. Inventing salacious stories about Hitler’s sex life is a cottage industry. But this article, written by someone who was actually close to Hitler, should put these tales where they belong: in the graveyard of historical lies. Esser describes Hitler as quite normal sexually and in the early years, highly interested in pursuing women. Apparently he had no trouble in procuring them...

He discusses in detail Hitler’s girlfriends of the 1920’s, his one night stands in the early days in Berlin and women’s hysterical reactions to him in private. In the second part of this series, Esser will devote considerable time in discussing Eva Braun, whom he met in 1930 and who eventually became the godmother of his daughter (also named Eva).
Esser’s piece, The Great Lover, Adolf Hitler appeared in Revue magazine between September 27-November 6, 1949. It caused a sensation and most copies were seized because West Germany authorities deemed it “sympathetic to Hitler’s image.” Esser was even arrested because he had “stirred up more Nazi trouble.”
Here is Esser in 1949, holding a newspaper which contained his [account of] Hitler’s “sex life”.
Image
. . . . . . .
Der Grosse Liebhaber Adolf Hitler
(‘The great lover Adolf Hitler’ by Hermann Esser)

Four years after the conclusion of the war, I still have people asking me if Hitler enjoyed the company of women. The question astounds me, since anybody who knew him as a young man would have the same opinion as I have: he was a ladies man through and through before he came to power. Hitler’s appreciation of women was conspicuous, and he always preferred their company to men. He was the Austrian charmer, who always offered hand kisses, flowers and car rides.

I will now share with you my personal experiences with the young Hitler. How we met, how we chased girls together, the names and personalities of some of his countless conquests, his love for his niece and for the woman he married in his Berlin bunker, Eva Braun.
I knew Adolf Hitler as well or better than anyone. I was one of the few party comrades who addressed him by his first name and with whom he used the intimate Du (the German informal form of you). He called me Hermann or sometimes Hermchen, when he was in a benign mood. I was at his beck and call throughout the decade of the 1920’s.
I saw him in private and in the company of girls nearly every day throughout the period of struggle. We had arguments, some of them heated, and we had break ups in our friendship throughout the years. Yet in 1939 on the day of my wedding, Hitler still took my hand and told me, “the happiest days of my life were the early ones spent with you in Munich.”

Image
Adolf and Hermann in 1933

Other friends of Hitler often said that he kept me around in the 1930’s solely because I knew too much about his private life... I sometimes had the impression this remark was true based on Hitler's attitude towards me, but I still saw him constantly until 1942 and was a constant guest at his home, the Berghof

Image
Adolf and Hermann at the Berghof in 1941

Part 1: How I Met Adolf Hitler
I met the future Führer in January, 1920 at the regional army headquarters in Munich. I was 19 years old and Hitler was then 30. He made an immediate impression on me, as he did with everyone who met him. I had heard about this fellow from some army comrades and I was impressed that a common soldier wore the Iron Cross first class. This was something usually only awarded to officers. Hitler’s spell bounding presence struck me profoundly. He had something about him which was quite incredible. He had it even then as an unknown soldier. He was unbelievably persuasive.

Image
Adolf in 1921

Hitler at that time was very thin, pale and usually in an excited frame of mind. His eyes, as everyone knows, were a luminous, deep blue. He had boundless energy, a frenetic mind and an aura about him that was unmistakable. I think I liked him immediately and was drawn to him in a way I never felt before. I felt he was the coming saviour of our nation. His dress and shoes were shabby, he ate little but radishes or bread and his apartment was rather downtrodden. His life then was very simple.

Image
Hitler’s Munich apartment between 1920-1929 was here on Thierschstrasse

A few days later Hitler came to a gathering of our small (Nazi) Party and he heard me speak for the first time. I was gaining a reputation as a forceful and lively public speaker, and Hitler always praised my talents as a talker. Hitler himself did not speak that night and he took me aside to ask me if we could meet for lunch the next day. Happily I agreed. We met at the Sterneckerbräu and had beers and schnitzel, since Hitler was not yet a vegetarian. I recall I paid for this meal and Hitler was effusive in thanking me. He always had excellent manners. It sounds odd to say it, but it’s true. Hitler always had impeccable manners with everyone, unless he was annoyed.

Image
The Sterneckerbräu

It wasn’t long before I realized Hitler’s tremendous impact on the female sex. Bear in mind no one in the general public knew who he was in the year 1920. His fame was not yet in existence. But I noticed not only the waitress, but several other young ladies there were making conspicuous eyes at him. This unsettled me because I was very young and always was interested in ladies myself. I already had much experience with girls, despite being only 19 years old.

I admitted to feeling pangs of jealousy, especially since Hitler seemed oblivious to the attention of the girls there. I asked him if he had a girlfriend and he laughed, saying he had “no time” for such things. Very quickly, however, I was to realize he was not being candid with me. From the very earliest days, Hitler always had girls hovering around him, and these were not platonic relationships. Like most soldiers at the front, Hitler was anxious to make up for lost time and avidly sought female companionship at this time. This is very little known about him today. But Hitler avidly pursued different women for the first 12 years of our association. And they pursued him.

Munich then was a city filled with men who had been ravaged in the Great War (WWI) and women who were lonely, widowed or victims of the inflation of those years. The cataclysmic events of the time created an atmosphere of free love and diminished morals. Casual relationships between men and women were accepted, as long as the girls did not get in trouble (i.e. get pregnant). People commonly speak of “free love” now, but Munich in the 1920’s always seemed to me even more liberal than Berlin, which was a Babylon.

Soon I was to become Hitler’s shadow and our tastes in young ladies were similar. We both liked young, pliable, naive girls. “Nice, sweet, cuddly things” as Hitler put it to me one day.
While my tastes evolved, Hitler’s never did. When he was 40, he still liked teenage girls. When he was 50 he already had Eva Braun, but had she not been in his life, I have no doubt he still would have preferred a young girl who never got older than 20. Incidentally, Hitler himself never made any excuses about this. To him, a hero such as himself “deserved” the most beautiful and the most willing women. It was his mindset.

Within a few months, Hitler and I became Du friends and we addressed each other by our first names. This continued until Hitler became Chancellor in 1933. Then he told me that his position demanded that I no longer be so familiar with him. I had to change my form of address to “Herr Hitler,” and even that was frowned upon, but I refused to call him “mein Führer” unless we were around other people. When we were alone, I always called him Herr Hitler. On rare occasions he would still call me Hermann and clap me on the back of the neck in a fond way.

In these early years, Hitler’s entire focus was on giving political speeches and gaining members for our political movement. We were not travelling much away from Munich in 1920-1923, but when we did, I was at Hitler’s side.
As the months passed, Hitler’s tremendous skills as an orator became apparent. He was mesmerising on stage and women, especially, were drawn to him. Women were simply hysterical to get close to him or become his favoured one. I used to tell him I wish I had what he had, but I had my hands full myself with an active life with women. Hitler used to say to me, “your habit is women. This will get you into trouble, my young friend.” He turned out to be a prophet in this regard.

One of Hitler’s strongest traits was that he was secretive. He often said, “I never tell anyone anything about me that is of a personal nature. They don’t need to know.” Many people in Hitler’s circle of associates had no clue about his private life. He was so successful with his secrecy that he hid much of what he was doing.

Image
Adolf in 1921

It was several months into our friendship before Hitler began to allow me a glimpse into his heavily guarded private life. He invited me to his apartment on the Thierschstasse, where he lived very modestly. In these two rooms, he had a hot plate, many books, a single bed and a dingy carpet. His drawings and architectural sketches were always lying all over the floor. The sink, bath and toilet were adjacent. Hitler was then very unaffected and would receive me in a white shirt with no collar, wearing his black pants with suspenders. It took about a year before one of his wealthy female benefactors purchased for him some new shirts, shoes, suspenders and socks.

On one visit to Hitler’s apartment, I noticed a card with some cherubs laying on his table, with feminine writing on it. Hitler hastily took the card and then said sheepishly, “this is just something personal of mine.” I soon discovered it was an affectionate greeting from his girlfriend of that period, a lovely girl named Suzi Liptauer. He introduced me to her shortly thereafter.

Suzi Liptauer

Hitler’s love affair with this Viennese beauty had begun about six months after I first met him. Suzi appeared in the summer and she was stunning. I myself was highly attracted to her, but kept my distance with difficulty, since she was “Hitler’s girl."
At that time, Suzi was about my age, 19, with dark blonde hair, blue eyes and a cupid’s bow mouth. She had the delightful Viennese charm to her, which spellbound men. Hitler, as he told me, rarely took her to his apartment for their trysts, but used another apartment which belonged to a party comrade who was a jeweler. Because Hitler’s nights were consumed with party matters and speeches, he had little time for seductions by night. He and Suzi met intimately in the afternoons.
Hitler made it a habit of taking "interludes” with Suzi several times a week. Party leaders grumbled about Hitler’s activities, whether through envy or genuine concern for the future of the National Socialist party, I can’t say.

I saw them together often throughout these early days. Suzi had every reason to be jealous of other women, since Hitler’s affections were not exclusive. In those days, it was difficult for him to remain faithful. He would generally have in his life one fairly steady companion, but he would still have adventures with other beautiful girls whom he met.
Interestingly, it didn’t matter to him if the woman was married. I saw him with a number of married women in the period 1920-1923. I noticed oftentimes Hitler was not the instigator in these love affairs, but was rather the hunted. Women sought him out increasingly, sometimes arriving at the door to his apartment. Many times I was with Hitler when a girl would timidly knock on his door, hoping for an invitation inside.

I admit I was enjoying my proximity to Hitler, because even though I was considered handsome and very eager, Hitler’s effect on women was unparalleled. In all my life I never saw anything like it. He didn’t have to try and gather women to him, they came in droves on their own. His charm, his riveting blue eyes and his seeming diffidence attracted women to him quite effortlessly. More and more women began attending our rallies and they would often be in the first row during his fiery speeches.

Suzi and Hitler did things as any other couple would do: they attended theatre performances, took drives, had picnics and ate meals together. I saw her sometimes at Hitler’s apartment, but never at night.
Even in these early days, Hitler was very secretive about his relationships with women, He was a bachelor and some assumed he had no outlets for his abundant nervous energy. Some to this day persist in this nonsense. Many party comrades legitimately believed he lived only for the party and was married to Germany. He was so clever in hiding his women that even today there are old fighters alive in Munich still who think Hitler was abstinent of women. I know better based on long years of personal experience with him. He was actually a notorious womanizer (Frauenheld) up until the time he became Chancellor in 1933.

Suzi sensed that Hitler was not faithful to her, and began to suffer from Hitler’s resistance to marrying her. She saw and heard many little things from gossipers in Munich, so Hitler eventually confessed that he could never marry her as his life belonged to Germany. She also had seen him in Munich in the company of two other girls, the musical twins he was crazy about for years.
Image
The Epp twins

Suzi’s bouts of jealousy were so acute that she threatened Hitler with suicide if he didn’t keep her. Hitler never spoke to me about this matter, but others in the party did so. I heard a great deal from Hitler’s limping adjutant, Julius Schaub, who was the man who kept Hitler’s “little black book” with the names of his various lady friends.

Finally the relationship between Hitler and Suzi ended. It was quite a mess at the time. Hitler had begun a relationship with another girl named Emmi. Some old gossip (Klatschbase) at the Viktualienmarkt in Munich told Suzi that her Adolf had lost his heart to another girl. Suzi promptly checked herself into a hotel in Munich and made a half-hearted suicide attempt by tying a sash from a robe around her neck. Some hotel chambermaids found her unconscious a short while later. Thankfully, there was no scandal and hardly anyone in the party even knew about it.
Hitler resumed his affair with Suzi after she recovered, out of a sense of guilt, I presume. Their afternoon lovemaking sessions continued on the Cornelisustrasse for awhile, but then they finally broke things off. Suzi later married an Austrian man and Hitler kept in contact with her for many years.

He usually remained on good terms with his former lovers, and he supported her financially at times, as Brückner (Hitler’s chief adjutant) told me. He always remembered her birthday and would instruct one of his adjutants to send her flowers, a card which he would sign, and a box of chocolates. Sometimes he gave them cash as well. He sent the same packages to many of his old flames. I know because several times I was personally the errand boy he selected for this delicate duty.

Image
Adolf in 1924

Image
Adolf Hitler and Hermann Esser photographed together in 1933

Image
Photos of Adolf and Hermann taken in 1933
Last edited by been-there on Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

User avatar
been-there
Propositions Moderator
Posts: 9228
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:59 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by been-there »

.
[continued from above: Herman Esser's 1949 account of Adolf Hitler's love life]

Emmi Marre

After Suzi’s exit from Hitler’s life, Emmi Marre entered his world. She was also well-built, blonde and blue eyed. A real Bavarian. She was a lively girl, full of fun and deeply attached to Hitler. Her greatest passion, as she told me, was to darn his socks, brew him tea and “tend to him."
She was 18 years old, but still liked to mother Hitler. She would scold him about his clothing and was constantly petting his hair, something which embarrassed him no end. In fact he put an end to that habit of her's fairly soon after their dalliance began.

I saw them often together in his various hangouts (Stammlokale). Hitler was always distant in public to his lovers. He firmly instructed them that there would be "no displays of love” in front of his comrades. Such a thing would have horrified him. He always followed this rule, but some of the women would press the point, and then soon be dropped from his presence. Hitler could sometimes be affectionate with his girlfriends, but they were not allowed to be so towards him. This never changed, incidentally, even with Eva Braun.
However, like many of his mistresses, Emmi was not discrete, and when Hitler was told that she was spreading details of their intimate life, he was ruthless. He said to me once, “Emmi can’t keep her mouth clamped shut. I am ending it tomorrow.”

Hitler was true to his word and we saw no more of Emmi. She wandered about, lost and lonely, bitterly crying that no other man would be like her Wölfchen (little wolf). I saw Emmi again with Hitler in 1929 but they were no longer lovers, merely friends. I was surprised they had remained in contact after all that time.
When someone or other would ask Hitler, “what ever became of Fräulein so and so?” Hitler would never answer. One of his adjutants might then say, “Oh, she hasn’t been seen lately.” This would generally halt the discussion and they would know Hitler and his latest treasure has broken up.


Jenny Haug

But our young Führer was not lonely for long. In late 1922, he began to openly court the lithe and lovely Jenny Haug. Jenny was the most serious and passionate relationship of Hitler’s early years. He had been in the habit of having “no strings attached” love relationships, but he fell quite hard for Jenny and no one would doubt the reason: she was an authentic beauty with a fabulous body. She lit a fire in him unlike no other woman had up to then.
Hitler first introduced me to Jenny at the Café Neumayr in Munich in the autumn of 1922. I had seen her before, working in a toy shop on Kaufingerstraße. Her brother, Ernst, was one of Hitler’s first drivers, and I knew him well. Jenny was then 18 years old and was unlike Hitler’s usual type. Though she was beautiful, she also had “spunk” and was the independent type.
She had a hearty laugh and said what was on her mind. This trait sometimes annoyed Hitler. They had some tiffs about this and I once personally witnessed him take a vase from the mantel of his photographer (Heinrich Hoffmann) and hurl it across the room. Why, you ask? Because Jenny had been interrupting him during lunch and not allowing him to talk.

Hitler did reimburse Hoffmann for the vase, and Hoffmann told this particular stories for years afterwards, much to Hitler’s chagrin.
Jenny really was deeply in love with Hitler, and he was so bold as to even take her on some trips, where he would discretely house her in an adjacent hotel room. To anyone who asked about her, she was passed off as a “married secretary,” and I myself provided a fake wedding band for her hand, which I bought from an old Army comrade who wanted to hock it.
Hitler and Jenny spent their afternoons often in the “rendezvous room,” which was an apartment at his disposal above the party HQ on Corneliusstraße in Munich. Only the closest party members knew about this room, where Hitler entertained many a Munich beauty in these early years.

Image
Jenny and Hitler’s trysting place in Munich

I must mention something in this context. It happened on at least two occasions that a former lover of Hitler approached him in Munich years after their “friendship” had ended. I know this because I was present both times. Hitler remembered each girl’s name, bowed and kissed their hands, then instructed Schaub to give them some money and make sure they got home safely in the service car.
He also had Schaub get their addresses, so they could be sent copies of Mein Kampf and birthday greetings when those days came along. Later Hitler told me he was always nervous when his old flames approached, anticipating a “scene.” However both times the ladies merely wanted to see him again and express their pleasure at his political success.

Jenny was almost as tall as Hitler, had a pair of blazing blue eyes and light brown hair which fell to her shoulders. When she once cut her hair, into a bob, Hitler was disconsolate and complained to me about it. But he also admitted to me that he “loved her” and she was “essential to his well being."
When he was expecting a visit from Jenny, he would pace about frantically, striking his thighs with his whip and in an obviously excited frame of mind. When she would arrive, Hitler’s eyes shown like saucers. He was really attracted to her. They made a genuinely solid couple. They looked well together and Hitler was happier than usual when she was nearby.

Image

I myself was also attracted to Jenny, as I was to many of Hitler’s girlfriends. But I never crossed the line into approaching them. I knew better. Hitler and I had become inseparable companions, and chasing girls was a passion we shared, as well as spending every hour in promoting the Party. Had he ever suspected I had made a play for one of his girls, there would have been a huge row. He might even have sacked me from my Party duties. This was a risk I refused to take.
I saw Jenny and Hitler for the next year together, more or less regularly. She adored him and they had many pet nicknames for each other, as lovers often do. She called him mein Kuscheltiger (my "cuddle tiger”) and he fondly called her meine Süße or mein Schnuckelchen (my sweety).

Hitler was less secretive about Jenny than his prior girlfriends, whom he jealousy hid from the other members of the party. With Jenny, they were openly seen at all of Hitler’s usual Munich haunts. He would hold her hand, but only under the table. In front of strangers, he instantly put on his “Führer mask” and pretended she was just a friend.
Jenny’s love for Hitler became ever greater, but so did her frustration. She wanted a normal life, with husband and children. She also wanted more of Hitler’s time, which he was unwilling to give her. His life was devoted to one thing: the pursuit of power and acquiring it.

But he still had girls available to him all over Munich, which was a temptation to him and remained so. Jenny sensed he was not faithful. Her attention never wandered from him and she took to carrying a small revolver in her purse in order to protect her Führer.

Image

Finally, this idyll ended, a few weeks before the Putsch (November 9, 1923, when Hitler unsuccessfully attempted to seize control of the government). We were all in Nürnberg for a Party event and Hitler refused to allow Jenny to accompany him. I saw her leaving his Thierschstrasse apartment completely dejected and crying. I walked her to the tram in a pouring rain and neither of us had an umbrella. She said, “I love him more than I can bear, but he says we cannot be together anymore.” She was truly in a state.

When I told Hitler about her emotions later that evening, he waved off my concerns.
“You know how I feel about my Jenny, but I cannot marry her or anyone else. She can’t accept that, so I have no other alternative but to give her up.”

Hitler still spoke to me fondly of Jenny for many years afterwards. In fact he mentioned her to me as late as 1939, instructing my second wife to hand deliver a letter to Jenny from him. What the letter contained I never found out.
It was during this time, that the Munich newspapers referred to Hitler as 'The King of Munich' which was his nickname through the many years of political struggle.

The opposition press began to write countless articles about Hitler’s women. As was written in the Tageblatt, “Hitler is the King of Munich. When asked what he lives upon and what his former occupation was, he flies into a rage. His conscience cannot be clean, especially because of his relations with women which as all Munich knows, is excessive. And all of these women cost him a great deal of money, where does it come from?”

Image
Herman Esser

During this time I had got a girl in trouble, and I did not wish to marry her. Hitler found out about it and forced me to marry Therese and “do the right thing”. [I.e. Esser had made her pregnant and made clear to her he thought it was her problem. She appealed directly to Hitler, who told Esser that he must do the right thing. Upon the birth of the child, Hitler became its godfather]
We were married on July 5, 1923, with Hitler as my best man. He congratulated us most heartily and used party funds to send us on a wonderful honeymoon to the Dolomites in Italy. I remember him even kissing Therese on both cheeks and saying happily, “I hope you can tame your wild Hermann.”

Image
Hitler attending Herman Esser's second wedding in 1939

This concludes part 1 of Hermann Esser’s reminiscences about Adolf Hitler.
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

kelnn1944
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2019 7:21 pm
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by kelnn1944 »

These articles about Hitler that been-there posted are copied, text and photos, verbatim from Putschgirl from Tumblr. Attribution for each of the cut and paste jobs are from Putschgirl's work, and she should be given credit for them. They are Putschgirl's work, not been-there's.

User avatar
Huntinger
Posts: 7173
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:56 am
Location: Gasthaus Waldesruh. Swabia
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by Huntinger »

kelnn1944 wrote:
Sat Mar 23, 2019 3:59 pm
These articles about Hitler that been-there posted are copied, text and photos, verbatim from Putschgirl from Tumblr. Attribution for each of the cut and paste jobs are from Putschgirl's work, and she should be given credit for them. They are Putschgirl's work, not been-there's.
So, normally BT gives a link, and it is obvious it is not his own work. Basically we know and well really no one cares. We have all forgotten to put in the links, but this is a forum to discuss the issues presented and not a forum of academia.


𝕴𝖈𝖍 𝖇𝖊𝖗𝖊𝖚𝖊 𝖓𝖎𝖈𝖍𝖙𝖘...𝕾𝖔𝖟𝖎𝖆𝖑 𝖌𝖊𝖍𝖙 𝖓𝖚𝖗 𝕹𝖆𝖙𝖎𝖔𝖓𝖆𝖑

𝕳𝖚̈𝖓𝖙𝖎𝖓𝖌𝖊𝖗

User avatar
been-there
Propositions Moderator
Posts: 9228
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:59 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by been-there »

.
Ho-hum. :roll:

The Erna Flegel interview I posted here is NOT from Putschgirl.
The last letter Magda Goebbels (formerly Frau Quant) sent to her son Harald is NOT either.
Neither is the last letter Joe Goebbels sent to his step-son Harald.
Nor is the 2005 interview — translated from German — of Rochus Misch that I posted, taken from Putschgirl.
Etc., etc., etc.

PLUS, anyone who can read and has any modicum of honesty will see here that I DID credit and post the name of Putschgirl as my source for the translation of Esser's account.

Image

And I have credited her for other material posted, e.g here
Image

And just for the record, some of the photos I have added to that translation of hers are NOT “...copied verbatim from Putschgirl from Tumblr”.
Many are, but I have sourced and added other relevant photos.
But who cares? It would appear to be only smallminded, deceitful people who feel the need to lie and attack when their cherished belief-systems are shown to be flawed.

Formatting and adding the photos takes considerable time. Which is why I haven't got around to finishing adding the rest of Esser's fascinating and historically informative account. Which I still intend to do, as Esser's account is quite unique in detailing the love-life of Adolf prior to 1933.

Putschgirl has undoubtedly done the world a great service by translating it, as the establishment and its subservient 'historians' prefer to perpetuate the myth of Hitler's sexual inadequacy and dysfunctionality in order to serve the tissue of lies about him and thereby about WW2 and about the grand 'H' mass-delusion that is increasingly becoming discredited. So gratitude to her is definitely warranted, whoever she is. Thanks Putschgirl!
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

User avatar
been-there
Propositions Moderator
Posts: 9228
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:59 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by been-there »

.
Who were Adolf Hitler's closest friends?

Below are mentioned just a few of some of the most well-known of Hitler's many friends during his fifty-six year life. We need to remember that most histories concentrate mainly upon — and judge him upon — only the last four years of his life, which was not representative of his whole life. Adolf Hitler was a very dearly loved person and had a great many friends. Many of whom remained devoted and loyal to him for the rest of their lives — even many years after his death.

ImageImageImage
Hitler picnicing with friends in the late 1920's or early thirties. One of his later lovers Marlene Weinrich on the far left with Wilhelm Brückner.
Geli his niece to Hitler's immediate right. Heini Hoffman Junior in the middle, Emil Maurice Hitler's Jewish friend with white shirt and tie, Therese 'Lelly' Hoffman with Julius Schaub on the far right. Presumably Heinrich Hoffman (senior) is taking the photograph.


Image
Hitler picnicing with friends. From top: Johanna Wolf, Adolf Hitler, Therese "Lelly" Hoffman,
Julius Schaub, Magda Quandt (later Mrs. Goebbels) wearing a white hat, Joseph Goebbels.


What is not so well known is that not only had Hitler many close friends, but he was very popular with the opposite sex and had many platonic female friends who adored him: Helene Hanfstaengel, Leni Riefenstahl, Lelly Hoffman, Inge Ley, etc.

Image
Hitler with Mrs. Inge Ley.
Image

Image
Hitler with Leni Riefenstahl.

Not only that, he had many intimate love relationships with women prior to 1933, the majority of whom he remained on friendly terms after their love affairs were over. See more on that topic here.

. . . .

Image
Image

Hitler’s closest friends
Amongst his closest and longest friendships I would mention Magda and Joseph Goebbels. These two loved him and witnesses have mentioned how Joseph Goebbels and Adolf Hitler were always joking and kidding around with each other. Plus Hitler spent a great deal of time at their home and was very close to their children.

Image
Adolf Hitler with Hildegard Traudel Goebbels

Image
Image
Adolf Hitler talking to Magda Goebbels; Joseph Goebbels and his eldest daughter Helga walk ahead.

Image
Adolf and Joseph sharing a joke

Image
Adolf and Joseph sharing a joke. Julius Schaub and Otto Dietrich only mildly amused.

. . . . . . . .

Then there was Heinrich Hoffman who began as his official photographer in 1919 but became a long-time and very close friend. In the 1920’s and 1930’s Hitler spent much of his time at the Hoffman home and he was also regarded as a very popular uncle-figure by Hoffman’s children.

Image
Image
Hitler with Heinrich Hoffman.

His daughter Henrietta Hoffman had known Hitler personally since she was 9 years old and was very close to him. He called her "my sunshine". She was also close friends with Geli Raubal (Hitler's neice), as well as with Eva Braun. She married Baldur von Schirach and was a regular vistor to Hitler’s mountain home in Berchtesgaden.

Here is John Toland's interview with Hoffman's son Heinrich Hoffman junior in 1978
JT: How old were you when you first remember Hitler?

HH: Oh, I was a very little. I was a little boy, maybe 5 years old when I first remember Hitler. He was a wonderful play companion for me, he was a special visitor, always. When he would show up in our house, I smiled because he was such fun and not like any other adult I had ever known. He could put himself at the level of a child and that’s enchanting to a boy.

JT: Do you have strong memories of Hitler when you were a boy?

HH: Yes. I was 4 or 5 years old when father first started bringing him around, as I said. I remember him well. He would bring me Pralines, rubber bands, small toy cars. He was a wonderful visitor for me and not just because of the chocolates. One thing I can mention in passing is that Hitler also could play the piano. He wasn’t a very good pianist, but he could pick out tunes and play a little.

Image

JT: How close were you to Hitler as you got older?

HH: As close as a person probably could be. I was born in 1916, I was 16 years old when he came to power. We still used Du (German intimate form of “you”) with each other at that time, later he dropped that. My sister had been very close to Hitler. I feel my father was his best friend. Also my mother adored him.

JT: Your mother sadly passed away when you were a boy?

HH: I was only 11, Henny was 13, almost 14.

JT: Did your mother know or like Hitler?

HH: Both! As I said she adored him. She always talked him up, she was his greatest supporter. He was very stricken when she died. He spent a great deal of time at our home after my mother left us. In fact I would admit to you that having Hitler around the house after my mother’s passing helped me. He said I was a “brave little comrade” for not crying at my mother’s funeral. He was really very saddened by her death, he had liked her very much.

JT: How would you describe Hitler then, when you were a boy?

HH: He was unlike anybody else I ever knew. Then or since. He was an extraordinary man, he had a photographic memory, he was a great imitator of people and he loved children. It was fun when he visited because he wasn’t run of the mill, he was just very, very different and more interesting than other people.

Image

JT: Did you ever see Hitler cry?

HH: Cry? Yes, I have seen this. He cried after Geli died, my father was with him out at the Tegernsee for a few days. He heard him crying for hours behind a closed and locked door. He told me that story many times later on. Then several months later, Herman Esser mentioned Geli at the table when we were eating on the Obersalzberg. I happened to glance at Hitler and he had tears streaming down his face.

I also saw him cry after his driver Julius Schreck died.

Image
Hitler with Julius Schreck
. . . . .

Then there was Rudolf Hess. Hitler was very loyal to his friends from the early days in Munich and Rudolf Hess had been with him from before the Beer hall putsch. Hess was also with him in Landsberg prison, typing out Mein Kampf to Hitler’s dictation. Herman Göring said of Hess in 1945:
Why the Führer kept him on as head of the party was a mystery to most people, but to me I always felt it was Hitler's loyalty to his old friends.
Image
Image
Image

. . . . . .

Herman Esser was another friend, (seen above with Hess and Hitler) though their close friendship was a bit on and off over the years.
Hitler was best man at Esser's first marriage.

Image
Image

. . . . .

Then there was the very long and close friendship that Hitler had with the Wagner family. He was a close friend to Winifred Wagner and her children.
Image
Image

. . . . . .

Image
Then of course there was Herman Göring, another long-time and loyal close friend. Hitler was best man at Göring’s second marriage after the death from ill-health of Göring's first wife.

Image

After the war Göring said this of his old friend:
“To me there are two Hitlers: one who existed until the end of the French war; the other begins with the Russian campaign. In the beginning he was genial and pleasant. He would have extraordinary willpower and unheard-of influence on people. The important thing to remember is that the first Hitler, the man who I knew until the end of the French war, had much charm and goodwill. He was always frank. The second Hitler, who existed from the beginning of the Russian campaign until his suicide, was always suspicious, easily upset, and tense. He was distrustful to an extreme degree.” (Said to Leon Goldensohn, 24th May 1946)
Image

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hXXnOVXgjQ
Pathe News reporting of Göring's wedding with Hitler as best-man.

. . . . .

Then there were Albert Speer, Arno Breker, Sepp Dietrich, Max Amman, Julius Schaub, Julius Schreck, Emil Maurice, etc.

I could go on listing more. But that is perhaps enough.

Image
With Julius Schreck and Rudolf Hess.

Image
With Sepp Dietrich.. . . . . .

Not only did Hitler have many close and long friendships he was also adored by his staff. Again not something that most people know.
To give just one example of that here is a part of an interview with his longest serving secretary Johanna Wolf given in February 1948, after she had been a part of his inner circle continually for seventeen years from Autumn 1929 until April 1945:
Q: I am interested in the character of Adolf Hitler from a historical point of view. It seems generally understood that he was capable of flying into terrible rages, and you’re saying this didn’t happen?

A: Well, I never experienced such a thing and I was part of his most intimate circle. I never saw him angry, that is the simple truth. Hitler in private was very pleasant and relaxing.

Q: Were you fond of him then?

A: Naturally I was more than merely ‘fond’ of him. I was intensely interested in him as a man and as a leader. He was the perfect boss and very delightful to be around him. Hitler was amazingly well informed, quite an interesting conversationalist, though he monopolised the talks generally. He also was a superb mimic. He imitated Mussolini, opera singers, people like that. He was very funny in his droll way. It was quite something of a privilege to be near him for so long. I won’t lie about this to you.

Q: How often did you have meals with him?

A: Every day. In the last few years, he ate exclusively with the secretaries whereas in the old days he would eat with Goebbels, military men, Hess, Speer or anyone else. Not in the last years.
Image
Johanna Wolf posing with her boss.

P.S.
SUPPRESSION & DELIBERATE MISINFORMATION REGARDING HITLER’S FRIENDSHIPS
Unfortunately the situation still today so many years after his death, is that many people think that to admit ANYTHING positive about the man and his life is to be some sort of neo-Nazi, Hitler-enthusiast.

Attempting to be realistic, impartial and wanting an accurate recording of history is regarded by many as suspect and even not permissable.
As an example of how any positive facts about him and his friendships are not welcomed, I give the following example.

As a young man in Vienna — after his mother died and when he was destitute and living off the sale of his watercolours to tourists — Hitler lived in a hostel for the homeless. While he lived there ALL his closest friends were Jewish. That is according to Reinhold Hanisch, who also lived at the homeless hostel and was his partner in selling his paintings. Hanisch maintained that Hitler associated almost exclusively with Jews during this time and said that Hitler's best friend in the home was the Jewish copper cleaner Josef Neumann. Another of his close Jewish friends mentioned by Hanisch was Simon Robinson, from Lisko in Galicia. This is attested to by all those who knew him then and has been published in numerous of the less deprecatory biographies. It was also again confirmed in a recent biography entitled ‘Hitler's Vienna’ by Brigitte Haman.

Yet editors at Wikipedia controlling the stub on Adolf Hitler refused to include this information, despite it being supported by numerous reputable, authoritative and verifiable citations. Instead they repeatedly deleted reference to this and today have allowed only this sentence: “Hitler had dealings with Jews while living in Vienna.”
I give this as an example of how details of Hitler’s many friendships are not only denied but information about them are actively suppressed.
Last edited by been-there on Sun Jun 16, 2019 4:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

User avatar
Friedrich Paul Berg
Posts: 3111
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:21 am
Contact:

Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

Post by Friedrich Paul Berg »

Thank you so much, been-there, for all of that.

The pictures and especially the eyes of Hitler and his friends tell us what was really going on. They loved him and why not?

The book about him by his architect, name escapes me, may be the most telling about that personal magic he had as no one else.

Can we ever even imagine seeing another such "Christ-like" person in our lifetimes? I think not.

FPBerg

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests