Quote for the day:

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Hüntinger
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Re: Quote for the day:

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been-there wrote: 15 Apr 2020, 10:06
[P.S. Official 'hollowco$t' sites can not even bring themselves to admit the existence of this hospital. Here one refers to it as a “so called prisoners hospital”. http://auschwitz.org/en/museum/about-th ... chwitz-iii]
Two genuine survivors Sam Pivnik and Pierre Berg both describe in vivid detail how when sick, they were admitted to the Birkenau hospital. Both boys were terrified, as they had heard rumours of execution if they did not get better in time. In both cases, Dr Mengele visited these patients giving a flick of his wrist to the side that meant death. Instead of execution both inmates received enhanced special treatment with improved food and medical care that included fresh milk.

Both prisoners report that the atrocities at the camp was due to other prisoners, the Kapos given power. Towards the end of the war things got worse as food and supplies dried up as a result of allied strategic attacks.

𝕸𝖊𝖎𝖓𝖊 𝕰𝖍𝖗𝖊 𝖍𝖊𝖎ß𝖙 𝕿𝖗𝖊𝖚𝖊
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been-there
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Re: Quote for the day:

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Re: Quote for the day:

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Interview by a journalist for Spiegel with German historian Volker Ullrich where he inadvertently admits and concedes that use of the word ausrotten and vernichtung can and did mean expulsion and forced exile, not extermination and mass-murder!!
In German, Spiegel wrote:SPIEGEL: Sie verweisen auf einen bislang unbekannten Brief vom August 1920, in dem ein Münchner Jurastudent nach einer Begegnung mit Hitler dessen Vorstellungen festhält: Was die Judenfrage angehe, sei er der Meinung, man müsse den Bazillus ausrotten, es handele sich um eine Frage von Sein oder Nichtsein des deutschen Volkes. Wie ernst war es Hitler da schon mit solchen Sätzen?

Ullrich: Das politische Projekt, das sich aus dieser Weltanschauung ableitet, heißt noch nicht Massenmord. Entfernung der Juden bedeutet trotz aller Vernichtungsrhetorik zunächst Vertreibung aus Deutschland. Die sogenannte Endlösung, also die planmäßige Ermordung der Juden Europas, rückt erst mit Beginn des Zweiten Weltkriegs in die Perspektive.

https://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-115560285.html
In English, Spiegel wrote:SPIEGEL: You refer to a previously unknown letter from August 1920, in which a Munich law student recorded Hitler's views after an encounter with him. When it came to Jews, Hitler said, he believed the virus must be eradicated, and that the existence of the German people was at stake. How seriously did Hitler mean such statements at that point?

Ullrich: The political project that arose from his worldview did not yet consist of mass murder. Despite all the rhetoric of annihilation, "getting rid of the Jews" at that point meant expelling them from Germany. The so-called "Final Solution," meaning the systematic murder of Europe's Jews, did not enter into the plan until the beginning of World War II.

https://www.spiegel.de/international/ge ... 27155.html
GOOGLE TRANSLATION:
“Despite all the rhetoric of extermination, the removal of the Jews initially means expulsion from Germany”.

SPIEGEL TRANSLATION:
“Despite all the rhetoric of annihilation, "getting rid of the Jews" at that point meant expelling them from Germany”.
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
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Re: Quote for the day:

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Someone on Quora asked “Why do some British people not like Donald Trump?”
Nate White from England wrote the following response:
A few things spring to mind.

Trump lacks certain qualities which the British traditionally esteem.
For instance, he has no class, no charm, no coolness, no credibility, no compassion, no wit, no warmth, no wisdom, no subtlety, no sensitivity, no self-awareness, no humility, no honour and no grace – all qualities, funnily enough, with which his predecessor Mr. Obama was generously blessed.
So for us, the stark contrast does rather throw Trump’s limitations into embarrassingly sharp relief.

Plus, we like a laugh. And while Trump may be laughable, he has never once said anything wry, witty or even faintly amusing – not once, ever.
I don’t say that rhetorically, I mean it quite literally: not once, not ever. And that fact is particularly disturbing to the British sensibility – for us, to lack humour is almost inhuman.
But with Trump, it’s a fact. He doesn’t even seem to understand what a joke is – his idea of a joke is a crass comment, an illiterate insult, a casual act of cruelty.

Trump is a troll. And like all trolls, he is never funny and he never laughs; he only crows or jeers.

And scarily, he doesn’t just talk in crude, witless insults – he actually thinks in them. His mind is a simple bot-like algorithm of petty prejudices and knee-jerk nastiness.
There is never any under-layer of irony, complexity, nuance or depth. It’s all surface.
Some Americans might see this as refreshingly upfront.
Well, we don’t. We see it as having no inner world, no soul.

And in Britain we traditionally side with David, not Goliath. All our heroes are plucky underdogs: Robin Hood, Dick Whittington, Oliver Twist.
Trump is neither plucky, nor an underdog. He is the exact opposite of that.
He’s not even a spoiled rich-boy, or a greedy fat-cat.
He’s more a fat white slug. A Jabba the Hutt of privilege.

And worse, he is that most unforgivable of all things to the British: a bully.
That is, except when he is among bullies; then he suddenly transforms into a snivelling sidekick instead.

There are unspoken rules to this stuff – the Queensberry rules of basic decency – and he breaks them all. He punches downwards – which a gentleman should, would, could never do – and every blow he aims is below the belt. He particularly likes to kick the vulnerable or voiceless – and he kicks them when they are down.

So the fact that a significant minority – perhaps a third – of Americans look at what he does, listen to what he says, and then think ‘Yeah, he seems like my kind of guy’ is a matter of some confusion and no little distress to British people, given that:
• Americans are supposed to be nicer than us, and mostly are.
• You don’t need a particularly keen eye for detail to spot a few flaws in the man.

This last point is what especially confuses and dismays British people, and many other people too; his faults seem pretty bloody hard to miss. After all, it’s impossible to read a single tweet, or hear him speak a sentence or two, without staring deep into the abyss. He turns being artless into an art form; he is a Picasso of pettiness; a Shakespeare of shit. His faults are fractal: even his flaws have flaws, and so on, ad infinitum.
God knows there have always been stupid people in the world, and plenty of nasty people too. But rarely has stupidity been so nasty, or nastiness so stupid.

He makes Nixon look trustworthy and George W look smart.
In fact, if Frankenstein decided to make a monster assembled entirely from human flaws – he would make a Trump.

And a remorseful Doctor Frankenstein would clutch out big clumpfuls of hair and scream in anguish:
‘My God… what… have… I… created?’

If being a twat was a TV show, Trump would be the boxed set.

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"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
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or they cease being honest"
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Hüntinger
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Re: Quote for the day:

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PrudentRegret wrote: 26 Apr 2020, 00:36 Dawson & Hunt should ponder this while they counter-signal revisionists but remain silent on the Holocaust propaganda being spread to millions by powerful political interests and mass media.

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Re: Quote for the day:

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been-there wrote:
Someone on Quora asked “Why do some British people not like Donald Trump?”
Nate White from England wrote the following response:
And worst of all, he isn't even a faggot or a pedophile.
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Re: Quote for the day:

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. .. .. .. .

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

If anyone has an emotional investment
in a particular viewpoint in any debate,
then they are usually not capable
of conducting a genuine open-ended debate.

They will instead only be interested in point-winning;
in buttressing their belief;
in avoiding 'defeat'.

Establishing truth and accuracy
will neither be a motivation nor a concern.



. .. .. .. .
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Re: Quote for the day:

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If the matter is one that can be settled by observation, make the observation yourself. Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted. He did not do so because he thought he knew. Thinking that you know when in fact you don't is a fatal mistake, to which we are all prone. I believe myself that hedgehogs eat black beetles, because I have been told that they do; but if I were writing a book on the habits of hedgehogs, I should not commit myself until I had seen one enjoying this unappetizing diet. Aristotle, however, was less cautious. Ancient and medieval authors knew all about unicorns and salamanders; not one of them thought it necessary to avoid dogmatic statements about them because he had never seen one of them.
If, like most of mankind, you have passionate convictions on many such matters, there are ways in which you can make yourself aware of your own bias. If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking as you do. If some one maintains that two and two are five, or that Iceland is on the equator, you feel pity rather than anger, unless you know so little of arithmetic or geography that his opinion shakes your own contrary conviction. The most savage controversies are those about matters as to which there is no good evidence either way.

~ Bertrand Russell, Unpopular essays, p. 116
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Re: Quote for the day:

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"Chinese Ambasssdor To Israel Found Dead In His Home"

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.co ... t-52696833
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