Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

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Nessie
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Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Nessie »

This is so Werd understands what acute and chronic exposure to CO means. He thinks chronic means low level and acute means high level, but the following definitions show chronic means over a long period of time and acute means over a short period of time.

viewtopic.php?p=174407#p174407
Werd wrote:Acute refers to PERCENTAGE AND LEVELS OF POISONING, NOT TIME!!!
The following all disagree with Werd;

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/18126.htm

"Acute conditions are severe and sudden in onset. This could describe anything from a broken bone to an asthma attack. A chronic condition, by contrast is a long-developing syndrome, such as osteoporosis or asthma."

https://www.verywellhealth.com/chronic- ... on-3157059

"Broadly speaking, acute conditions are those that occur suddenly, have immediate or rapidly developing symptoms, and are limited in their duration (e.g., the flu). Chronic conditions, on the other hand, are described as those that are long-lasting and develop and potentially worsen over time (e.g., Crohn's disease)."

https://www.diffen.com/difference/Acute_vs_Chronic

"An acute condition is one where symptoms appear suddenly and worsen rapidly, while a chronic condition is one that develops gradually and worsens over an extended period of time.
Acute pain tells your body you’ve been hurt — say, when you fall, stub a toe, burn your finger, etc. The pain appears suddenly, peaks as a signal to your body to heal the injury, and wanes as it heals. Similarly, acute illnesses like flu or common cold afflict a person suddenly, worsen over a short period, and then disappear.
Chronic pain, on the other hand creeps up on you gradually, and by the time you feel its presence, you realize it has been there for a while. It lasts for weeks, even months beyond the expected recovery, till you feel the pain itself is a disease and becomes a part of you. Back pain that lasts for months and worsens over time is a good example of chronic pain."

A low exposure to CO gas over many days would be chronic. A low exposure to CO over a few minutes would be acute. Symptoms would be mild, death would not occur.

A high exposure, one high enough to kill, can ONLY be acute, since CO's effect on the body means death comes quickly. You cannot die from a high level exposure to CO over a long period of time. It kills too quickly.
Consistency and standards in evidencing viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2721#p87772
My actual argument viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2834

Scott - On a side note, this forum is turning into a joke with the vicious attacks--and completely unnecessary vitriol--that everybody is making upon each other.

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Huntinger
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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Huntinger »

Acute conditions are severe and sudden in onset. A chronic condition, by contrast is a long-developing syndrome.


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Turnagain
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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Turnagain »

Then we have the chronic condition with acute flareups such as migraine headaches. Same for asthma and a multitude of other conditions.

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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Werd »

"Acute conditions are severe and sudden in onset.
HIGH LEVELS OF CO POISONING AND HIGH LEVELS OF COHB ARE SEVERE, JACKASS! :lol:
A low exposure to CO gas over many days would be chronic.
LOW EXPOSURE. LOW LEVELS. CHRONIC! THERE YOU GO. THEY'RE LINKED! CHECK YOUR DIAGRAM AGAIN!
Image
LOOK AT WHERE THE CUTOFF IS BETWEEN ACUTE AND CHRONIC ON THE DIAGRAM! AT CERTAIN LEVELS OF CONCENTRATION OF SAID POISON!
"An acute condition is one where symptoms appear suddenly and worsen rapidly
IN OTHER WORDS, THE SYMPTOMS ARE MORE LIFE THREATENING BECAUSE THE LEVELS OF POISONING ARE HIGHER! "LEVELS" LINKED TO "ACUTE" ONCE AGAIN!

IN THE CONTEXT OF CO POISONING, "acute" and "severe" clearly have to do with levels. THE FACT THAT NESSIE WANTS TO AVOID THIS CONTEXT AND BRING IN ANOTHER IRRELEVANT CONTEXT IN WHICH ACUTE AND CHRONIC ARE USED SHOWS HE LIKES HIS RED HERRING FALLACIES AND CAN'T STICK TO THE SUBJECT!

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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Huntinger »

Nessie wrote:
Fri Jul 10, 2020 8:42 pm
A low exposure to CO gas over many days would be chronic. A low exposure to CO over a few minutes would be acute. Symptoms would be mild, death would not occur.
This topic should not be in the Holocaust forum. An “acute dose” (short-term high-level dose) is what is used and fits in with the meaning of "acute"; it is clear that the poster has no idea what they are talking about.


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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Turnagain »

That Nessie lives in a la-la land isn't just a figure of speech.

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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Huntinger »

Turnagain wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 7:39 am
That Nessie lives in a la-la land isn't just a figure of speech.
It is incredible that he makes a whole thread and shows his lack of knowledge. 'Some might call this ignorance appalling.


𝕴𝖈𝖍 𝖇𝖊𝖗𝖊𝖚𝖊 𝖓𝖎𝖈𝖍𝖙𝖘...𝕾𝖔𝖟𝖎𝖆𝖑 𝖌𝖊𝖍𝖙 𝖓𝖚𝖗 𝕹𝖆𝖙𝖎𝖔𝖓𝖆𝖑

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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Nessie »

Werd wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:13 am
"Acute conditions are severe and sudden in onset.
HIGH LEVELS OF CO POISONING AND HIGH LEVELS OF COHB ARE SEVERE, JACKASS! :lol:
A low exposure to CO gas over many days would be chronic.
LOW EXPOSURE. LOW LEVELS. CHRONIC! THERE YOU GO. THEY'RE LINKED!
Yes, they are linked, in that some illnesses are acute (short term) and some are chronic (long term), but the acute and chronic part only refers to time.
CHECK YOUR DIAGRAM AGAIN!
Image
LOOK AT WHERE THE CUTOFF IS BETWEEN ACUTE AND CHRONIC ON THE DIAGRAM! AT CERTAIN LEVELS OF CONCENTRATION OF SAID POISON!
"An acute condition is one where symptoms appear suddenly and worsen rapidly
IN OTHER WORDS, THE SYMPTOMS ARE MORE LIFE THREATENING BECAUSE THE LEVELS OF POISONING ARE HIGHER! "LEVELS" LINKED TO "ACUTE" ONCE AGAIN!

IN THE CONTEXT OF CO POISONING, "acute" and "severe" clearly have to do with levels. THE FACT THAT NESSIE WANTS TO AVOID THIS CONTEXT AND BRING IN ANOTHER IRRELEVANT CONTEXT IN WHICH ACUTE AND CHRONIC ARE USED SHOWS HE LIKES HIS RED HERRING FALLACIES AND CAN'T STICK TO THE SUBJECT!
A low level of exposure to CO would lead to a chronic, long term illness, because people can survive the symptoms of a low level of exposure. A high level of exposure to CO leads to an acute illness with symptoms that hospitalise or at very high level, a quick death occurs.

That does not mean acute and chronic mean high and low level, it means that when the level is low, the result is a chronic condition and when the level is high it is an acute condition. All poisons are the same.

The ONLY relevant symptoms for those killed in the gas chambers are those recorded with acute (short term) exposure to very high levels (levels that will kill in a matter of minutes).
Consistency and standards in evidencing viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2721#p87772
My actual argument viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2834

Scott - On a side note, this forum is turning into a joke with the vicious attacks--and completely unnecessary vitriol--that everybody is making upon each other.

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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Huntinger »

Nessie wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 9:16 am
Yes, they are linked, in that some illnesses are acute (short term) and some are chronic (long term), but the acute and chronic part only refers to time.
This poster has no idea of what he is talking about. Acute in the context of medicine and anything else means severe but of short duration. Acute is not just temporal as this poster is suggesting but a matter of magnitude or intensity.
A low level of exposure to CO would lead to a chronic, long term illness, because people can survive the symptoms of a low level of exposure. A high level of exposure to CO leads to an acute illness with symptoms that hospitalise or at very high level, a quick death occurs.

This is nonsense. We are all exposed to low levels of everything including Carbon Monoxide without being ill. A high level of CO is acute and often deadly.
That does not mean acute and chronic mean high and low level, it means that when the level is low, the result is a chronic condition and when the level is high it is an acute condition. All poisons are the same.
Acute conditions are severe and sudden in onset. This could describe anything from a broken bone to an asthma attack. A chronic condition, by contrast is a long-developing syndrome, such as osteoporosis or asthma.
The ONLY relevant symptoms for those killed in the gas chambers are those recorded with acute (short term) exposure to very high levels (levels that will kill in a matter of minutes).
Hydrogen cyanide is a highly toxic substance; acute exposure at relatively low doses can result in death as will Carbon Monoxide. CO is not as lethal.


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Re: Acute and chronic exposure, what do they mean?

Post by Nessie »

If an illness is an acute illness, what can you tell me about that illness?
Consistency and standards in evidencing viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2721#p87772
My actual argument viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2834

Scott - On a side note, this forum is turning into a joke with the vicious attacks--and completely unnecessary vitriol--that everybody is making upon each other.

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