Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a plagiarist?

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David Green
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Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a plagiarist?

Post by David Green » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:17 pm

Kitty Hart-Moxon is Britain's best known and loved Holocaust survivor. Kitty first came to the nation's attention in November 1979 with the broadcast of Yorkshire Television's Kitty - Return to Auschwitz. After which she co-authored the bestselling book Kitty - Return to Auschwitz with James Burke. Since then the humble Kitty has been showered with honours such as honorary doctorates from respected British universities and an OBE awarded to her by Queen Elizabeth II. However, there is compelling evidence Kitty Hart-Moxon actually fabricated her wartime experiences at Auschwitz and plagiarized Krystyna Zywulska's 1951 book I Came Back.

To compare the texts of Krystyna Zywulska's I Came Back © 1951 and Kitty Hart-Moxon's I Am Alive © 1961 I have used only the original 1951 and 1961 books.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image



To wet your appetite:

Krystyna Zywulska:
I awoke wet with perspiration. They were calling us for the morning roll-call. I was shivering and couldn't get up. Typhus? I rose with difficulty and went out of the barrack. My shivering grew more intense.
I knew I was ill.
(p.78)

I tried to get out of bed but my knees buckled under―they were like cotton. I fell over a bucket.
(p.79)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
I woke in the night covered in sweat. I realized then I was ill. Was it Typhus? This was very probable for everyone caught it sooner or later.
(p.76)

I tried hard to get up in the morning , but my legs felt as if they were made of cotton wool, my knees bent under me and I collapsed.
(p.76)
Krystyna Zywulska:
At noon , two prisoners from the hospital came for me with a stretcher. Wala had sent for them.
(p.79)

They placed me on a pallet. Someone was already on it. I straightened my legs with difficulty. The other one's feet were touching my face.
(p.80)

The woman in my bed was very ill. She was kicking and twisting in bed. I begged her to stop, but she did not hear me.
(p.80)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
Immediately after the morning roll call I was dragged to the Revir.
(p.76)

The block was full, and the single bunk that I lay on already had three occupants. One patient had diphtheria, another malaria and the third, like me, had typhus. All four of us was seriously ill. The typhus girl was unconscious, kicking out and throwing her body against the others. they begged her to lie still, but she was unable to hear. Continuously somebody's feet were in my face.
(pp.76-77)
Krystyna Zywulska:
In comparison with the quarantine and hospital barracks, our hut seemed luxurious. It had three normal windows and opposite the windows stood our three tier bunks. Our mattresses were packed tight with straw and each of us slept separately.
(p.118)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
Our huts were luxurious in comparison with those in the main camps. There were only about three hundred girls to a hut. Inside were three-tier single bunks, with well filled straw mattresses and two blankets each. There were even proper windows with a view―of the gas chambers and crematoria.
(p.85)

Krystyna Zywulska:
First came the black limousine. We waited expectantly. Then came trucks loaded with wood. We knew―that was Kramer, the chief of crematories, the same one who had stopped us when returning from the fields.
[...]
Berlin had issued an order: burn 800,000 Hungarian Jews within a month and a half.
Wala and the others from the political office had told us that immediately after receiving the order, a 'devils council' had been held in the camp. Hustek, Kramer, Mohl and the others took part in it. Putting their heads together above the table they planned how to burn 800,000 human beings. Twenty thousand a day―that would be child's play.
(p.163)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
The usual drunken sessions were to be seen, but at the same time a conference was taking place and every word could be heard. The drunken, bloodthirsty maniacs were working out plans to carry out the Berlin order. They had a problem on their hands - how to dispose of twenty thousand people a day.
(p.101)
The first indication that something was going to happen was the appearance of a big black saloon car. Inside sat Oberführer Eichmann who had been entrusted with the solution of the Jewish question, and who came personally to supervise the great slaughter. There was Lagerführer Krammer, Rapportführer Schillinger, and other high-ups including Hustek, Moll and Buch.
(p.102)
A PDF file containing all the suspect texts can be downloaded from this location:

http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?fi ... 8373698912

http://www.filehosting.org/file/details ... _Alive.pdf

I would be interested to hear the opinions of others here on what could become a very controversial matter. I will return to RODOH tomorrow and expand a little on what I have covered in this post.


[Edit: I added a link to the PDF file which does not require an email to be entered to enable the download.]
Last edited by David Green on Sun Jan 07, 2018 1:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Nessie
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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Nessie » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:36 pm

The two texts are definitely not plagiarised, as that would require verbatim copying. They are barely paraphrased and considering women at the camp had very similar experiences, in what was a very structured regime for them, it is hardly suprising they describe similar things. Getting typhus and the same symptom which all typhus sufferers get is hardly plagiarism. A black limo or big saloon for when describing the same car is neither plagiarism nor paraphrasing.

You should read this on plagiarism so you know more about that subject;

https://www.ox.ac.uk/students/academic/ ... ism?wssl=1
Consistency and standards in evidencing viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2721#p87772
My actual argument viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2834

Scott - On a side note, this forum is turning into a joke with the vicious attacks--and completely unnecessary vitriol--that everybody is making upon each other.

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Charles Traynor
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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Charles Traynor » Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:18 pm

From the link you gave us, Nessie:
The necessity to acknowledge others’ work or ideas applies not only to text, but also to other media...
Plagiarism doesn't have to be word for word, Nessie.

I have read both books mentioned by David in the OP and agree Kitty Hart appears to have stolen Krystyna Zywulska's entire Auschwitz experience. The only real question is whether Zywulska and her publishers knew of this and condoned Hart's borrowing of the work. Either way Hart-Moxon has deceived her readers by not acknowledging Krystyna Zywulska's influence on her story.

Why did Kitty Hart have to borrow so heavily from Krystyna Zywulska if she really was an Auschwitz survivor?

Kitty Hart borrowed KZ's ridiculous description of homicidal gassings at Krema IV almost word for word. I think in the coming days we are about to lose another witness to the gas chamber lie. Little wonder then that Nessie has joined this topic so early with the obvious intention of defending KHM's reputation to the last.
Kitty Hart-Moxon (1998): "Believe me, I came into Auschwitz in a much worse condition than I actually left it."

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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Charles Traynor » Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:29 pm

Moderators please keep a close eye on this topic -- I suspect the usual suspects will attempt to destroy this thread in an attempt to protect Kitty Hart's reputation.
Kitty Hart-Moxon (1998): "Believe me, I came into Auschwitz in a much worse condition than I actually left it."

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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Nessie » Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:30 pm

Charles Traynor wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:18 pm
From the link you gave us, Nessie:
The necessity to acknowledge others’ work or ideas applies not only to text, but also to other media...
Plagiarism doesn't have to be word for word, Nessie.

.....
Indeed, which is why the link also refers to paraphrasing. The two sets of text are neither word for word lifts nor paraphrasing. They are similar, which is what one would expect when two people describe the same thing. Typhus, bunk beds, being carried on a stretcher, a Nazi appearing in a black car, how much variation would you expect?
Consistency and standards in evidencing viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2721#p87772
My actual argument viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2834

Scott - On a side note, this forum is turning into a joke with the vicious attacks--and completely unnecessary vitriol--that everybody is making upon each other.

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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Charles Traynor » Fri Jan 05, 2018 8:50 pm

Nessie's own defence strategy labels Kitty Hart-Moxon a plagiarist.


Examples of plagiarism

There are some helpful examples of plagiarism-by-paraphrase and you will also find extensive advice on the referencing and library skills pages.
The following examples demonstrate some of the common pitfalls to avoid. These examples use the referencing system prescribed by the History Faculty but should be of use to students of all disciplines.

Source text

From a class perspective this put them [highwaymen] in an ambivalent position. In aspiring to that proud, if temporary, status of ‘Gentleman of the Road’, they did not question the inegalitarian hierarchy of their society. Yet their boldness of act and deed, in putting them outside the law as rebellious fugitives, revivified the ‘animal spirits’ of capitalism and became an essential part of the oppositional culture of working-class London, a serious obstacle to the formation of a tractable, obedient labour force. Therefore, it was not enough to hang them – the values they espoused or represented had to be challenged.

(Linebaugh, P., The London Hanged: Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century (London, 1991), p. 213. [You should give the reference in full the first time you use it in a footnote; thereafter it is acceptable to use an abbreviated version, e.g. Linebaugh, The London Hanged, p. 213.]

Plagiarised

1. Although they did not question the inegalitarian hierarchy of their society, highwaymen became an essential part of the oppositional culture of working-class London, posing a serious threat to the formation of a biddable labour force. (This is a patchwork of phrases copied verbatim from the source, with just a few words changed here and there. There is no reference to the original author and no indication that these words are not the writer’s own.)

2. Although they did not question the inegalitarian hierarchy of their society, highwaymen exercised a powerful attraction for the working classes. Some historians believe that this hindered the development of a submissive workforce. (This is a mixture of verbatim copying and acceptable paraphrase. Although only one phrase has been copied from the source, this would still count as plagiarism. The idea expressed in the first sentence has not been attributed at all, and the reference to ‘some historians’ in the second is insufficient. The writer should use clear referencing to acknowledge all ideas taken from other people’s work.)

3. Although they did not question the inegalitarian hierarchy of their society, highwaymen ‘became an essential part of the oppositional culture of working-class London [and] a serious obstacle to the formation of a tractable, obedient labour force’.1 (This contains a mixture of attributed and unattributed quotation, which suggests to the reader that the first line is original to this writer. All quoted material must be enclosed in quotation marks and adequately referenced.)

4. Highwaymen’s bold deeds ‘revivified the “animal spirits” of capitalism’ and made them an essential part of the oppositional culture of working-class London.1 Peter Linebaugh argues that they posed a major obstacle to the formation of an obedient labour force. (Although the most striking phrase has been placed within quotation marks and correctly referenced, and the original author is referred to in the text, there has been a great deal of unacknowledged borrowing. This should have been put into the writer’s own words instead.)

5. By aspiring to the title of ‘Gentleman of the Road’, highwaymen did not challenge the unfair taxonomy of their society. Yet their daring exploits made them into outlaws and inspired the antagonistic culture of labouring London, forming a grave impediment to the development of a submissive workforce. Ultimately, hanging them was insufficient – the ideals they personified had to be discredited.1 (This may seem acceptable on a superficial level, but by imitating exactly the structure of the original passage and using synonyms for almost every word, the writer has paraphrased too closely. The reference to the original author does not make it clear how extensive the borrowing has been. Instead, the writer should try to express the argument in his or her own words, rather than relying on a ‘translation’ of the original.)

Non-plagiarised

1. Peter Linebaugh argues that although highwaymen posed no overt challenge to social orthodoxy – they aspired to be known as ‘Gentlemen of the Road’ – they were often seen as anti-hero role models by the unruly working classes. He concludes that they were executed not only for their criminal acts, but in order to stamp out the threat of insubordinacy.1 (This paraphrase of the passage is acceptable as the wording and structure demonstrate the reader’s interpretation of the passage and do not follow the original too closely. The source of the ideas under discussion has been properly attributed in both textual and footnote references.)

2. Peter Linebaugh argues that highwaymen represented a powerful challenge to the mores of capitalist society and inspired the rebelliousness of London’s working class.1 (This is a brief summary of the argument with appropriate attribution.)

1 Linebaugh, P., The London Hanged: Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century (London, 1991), p. 213.

https://www.ox.ac.uk/students/academic/ ... ism?wssl=1
Kitty Hart-Moxon (1998): "Believe me, I came into Auschwitz in a much worse condition than I actually left it."

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Nessie
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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Nessie » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:08 pm

The examples are not similar enough for plagiarised work in terms of sentence structure and word order. The closest to a similarity is

"knees buckled under―they were like cotton"
"my legs felt as if they were made of cotton wool, my knees bent under me"

and the only absolute similarity is

"I tried to get...."

In two books about the same experience, one of which is a translation, that there are similarities is not odd at all.
Consistency and standards in evidencing viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2721#p87772
My actual argument viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2834

Scott - On a side note, this forum is turning into a joke with the vicious attacks--and completely unnecessary vitriol--that everybody is making upon each other.

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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a liar and a plagiarist?

Post by Jeffk1970 » Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:19 am

One of the RODOH members named Ian Hazard opened this at Skeptics:

http://www.skepticforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=39&t=28959

First, I commend Ian for showing both guts and balls to post something at Skeptics......unlike others I know.

Second, as Nessie says, both are translations of similar experiences. Naturally there is overlap.

Ian neglected to post a link back to Skeptics, I’ve corrected this oversight. Feel to join us.

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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a plagiarist?

Post by been-there » Sat Jan 06, 2018 8:14 am

David Green wrote:
Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:17 pm
Kitty Hart-Moxon is Britain's best known and loved Holocaust survivor. Kitty first came to the nation's attention in November 1979 with the broadcast of Yorkshire Television's Kitty - Return to Auschwitz. After which she co-authored the bestselling book Kitty - Return to Auschwitz with James Burke. Since then the humble Kitty has been showered with honours such as honorary doctorates from respected British universities and an OBE awarded to her by Queen Elizabeth II. However, there is compelling evidence Kitty Hart-Moxon actually fabricated her wartime experiences at Auschwitz and plagiarized Krystyna Zywulska's 1951 book I Came Back.

To compare the texts of Krystyna Zywulska's I Came Back © 1951 and Kitty Hart-Moxon's I Am Alive © 1961 I have used only the original 1951 and 1961 books.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image



To whet your appetite:

Krystyna Zywulska:
I awoke wet with perspiration. They were calling us for the morning roll-call. I was shivering and couldn't get up. Typhus? I rose with difficulty and went out of the barrack. My shivering grew more intense.
I knew I was ill.
(p.78)

I tried to get out of bed but my knees buckled under―they were like cotton. I fell over a bucket.
(p.79)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
I woke in the night covered in sweat. I realized then I was ill. Was it Typhus? This was very probable for everyone caught it sooner or later.
(p.76)

I tried hard to get up in the morning , but my legs felt as if they were made of cotton wool, my knees bent under me and I collapsed.
(p.76)
Krystyna Zywulska:
At noon , two prisoners from the hospital came for me with a stretcher. Wala had sent for them.
(p.79)

They placed me on a pallet. Someone was already on it. I straightened my legs with difficulty. The other one's feet were touching my face.
(p.80)

The woman in my bed was very ill. She was kicking and twisting in bed. I begged her to stop, but she did not hear me.
(p.80)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
Immediately after the morning roll call I was dragged to the Revir.
(p.76)

The block was full, and the single bunk that I lay on already had three occupants. One patient had diphtheria, another malaria and the third, like me, had typhus. All four of us was seriously ill. The typhus girl was unconscious, kicking out and throwing her body against the others. they begged her to lie still, but she was unable to hear. Continuously somebody's feet were in my face.
(pp.76-77)
Krystyna Zywulska:
In comparison with the quarantine and hospital barracks, our hut seemed luxurious. It had three normal windows and opposite the windows stood our three tier bunks. Our mattresses were packed tight with straw and each of us slept separately.
(p.118)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
Our huts were luxurious in comparison with those in the main camps. There were only about three hundred girls to a hut. Inside were three-tier single bunks, with well filled straw mattresses and two blankets each. There were even proper windows with a view―of the gas chambers and crematoria.
(p.85)

Krystyna Zywulska:
First came the black limousine. We waited expectantly. Then came trucks loaded with wood. We knew―that was Kramer, the chief of crematories, the same one who had stopped us when returning from the fields.
[...]
Berlin had issued an order: burn 800,000 Hungarian Jews within a month and a half.
Wala and the others from the political office had told us that immediately after receiving the order, a 'devils council' had been held in the camp. Hustek, Kramer, Mohl and the others took part in it. Putting their heads together above the table they planned how to burn 800,000 human beings. Twenty thousand a day―that would be child's play.
(p.163)
Kitty Hart-Moxon:
The usual drunken sessions were to be seen, but at the same time a conference was taking place and every word could be heard. The drunken, bloodthirsty maniacs were working out plans to carry out the Berlin order. They had a problem on their hands - how to dispose of twenty thousand people a day.
(p.101)
The first indication that something was going to happen was the appearance of a big black saloon car. Inside sat Oberführer Eichmann who had been entrusted with the solution of the Jewish question, and who came personally to supervise the great slaughter. There was Lagerführer Krammer, Rapportführer Schillinger, and other high-ups including Hustek, Moll and Buch.
(p.102)
A PDF file containing all the suspect texts can be downloaded from this location:

http://www.filehosting.org/file/details ... _Alive.pdf

I would be interested to hear the opinions of others here on what could become a very controversial matter. I will return to RODOH tomorrow and expand a little on what I have covered in this post.
Wow. Excellent work, David.

That this deceitful, delusional women was given an OBE by the Queen for spreading her lies to schoolchildren is a symbol of just how sick this whole 'holocaust' industry has been allowed to become. Sick and shameful.

Thanks for exposing this.
Last edited by been-there on Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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David Green
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Re: Is Kitty Hart-Moxon a plagiarist?

Post by David Green » Sat Jan 06, 2018 10:25 am

Before continuing I would like to make it clear I do not claim to have made the initial discovery of the similarity in texts between these two books. I merely followed the clues left by Sergey Romanov and Michael Mills at the Axis History Forum. If either of these fellows dug a little deeper into the matter of Hart-Moxon's uncredited borrowing of KZ's work after their initial exchanges on AHF, I do not know. Both Romanov and Mills have to the best of my knowledge remained completely silent on this matter ever since.

Please follow the link below and familiarise yourselves with the exchange between Romanov and Mills before we move on. Thank you.

https://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic ... t#p1461064

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