Aspects of Hitler's personal life

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Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

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.
The meeting between Nobel prize winning Quantum physcist Max Planck and Adolf Hitler in May 1933.

Following Hitler’s achieving power, I had the responsibility as president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society of paying my respects to the Führer.
I believed I should take this opportunity to put in a favourable word for my Jewish colleague Fritz Haber, without whose invention of the process for producing ammonia from nitrogen in air the previous war would have been lost from the start.

Hitler answered me with these words:
I have nothing against Jews as such. But most Communists are Jews, and it is the latter who are my enemies; it is against them that my fight is directed.”
I commented that there are different types of Jews, both worthy and worthless ones to humanity, with old families of the highest German culture among the former; and when I suggested that a distinction would have to be made between them after all, he replied:
“That’s not right. A Jew is a Jew; all Jews stick together like burrs. Where there is one Jew, all kinds of other Jews gather right away. It would have been the duty of the Jews themselves to draw a dividing line between the various types. They did not do this; and that is why I must act against all Jews equally.”
He ignored my comment that forcing worthy Jews to emigrate would be equivalent to mutilating ourselves outright, because we direly need their scientific work and their efforts would otherwise go primarily to the benefit of foreign countries.

~~ Max Planck relating in May 1947 the part of his conversation concerning Jews that he had during his audience with Adolf Hitler

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epd ... 9470030502
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

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been-there
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Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

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Letters written by Adolf’s father found in an Austrian attic

By Michael S. Rosenwald — March 21st 2021

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Part of a fairly recent discovery of a collection of letters written by Alois Hitler, Adolf’s father.

...it is possible that nobody in history has been written about more than Adolf Hitler.
By 1975, thirty years after [his death] at the end of World War II, more than 50,000 books and scholarly articles had been written about him, according to a 2006 study of those studies. Two decades later, the total reached 120,000.
“That computes to more than 24 scholarly books and articles on Hitler and Nazism published every working day for 20 years — and the number is growing exponentially,” the study said. “Thus public interest in the mystery of Hitler continues to grow, with no end in sight.”
Yet among these millions (probably billions) of words, relatively few have illuminated the lives of two central figures in Hitler’s life — his parents Alois and Klara, about whom little-to-no primary research materials survived the world wars.

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Or at least that’s what historians had resigned themselves to accepting.
But one of the tropes of history are letters that turn up in dusty attics. And a few years ago, in the tiny Austrian town of Wallern, a pensioner named Anneliese Smigielski was rummaging in her attic when she happened upon 31 letters written by none other than Alois Hitler.

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A letter by written by Alois Hitler to road maintenance official Joseph Radlegger concerning the sale of a farmhouse.

Smiglieski turned the letters over to Roman Sandgruber, an Austrian historian who used them to write ‘Hitler’s father: how the son became a dictator’ the first known biography of Alois Hitler. The book, written in German, was published last month in Austria; there is no English translation yet.

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Roman Sandgruber, the Austrian historian posing with the letters in an attic.

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Alois wrote the letters to Smiglieski’s great-great-grandfather, Joseph Radlegger, a civil servant who sold his farmhouse in Hafeld, a small village, to Alois Hitler in 1895 when Adolf was 6 years old. While the letters deal with the transaction, they also detail the dynamics of the Hitler family.

“You learn a lot about the family’s financial situation, the type of management planned and life on the farm. We learn a lot about the rural environment in which Adolf Hitler experienced the beginning of his school days” Sandgruber said in an interview over email.

Alois had grown up on a farm but moved to Vienna as a teenager. The letters reveal how he yearned to get back to farm life, taking courses on agrarian life. They also reveal a far different relationship with his wife Klara than had been previously known or speculated about.

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Alois Hitler in 1900.

Though accounts of Alois’s later life describe him as a brutish drunk and abuser [heavy drinker and abusive father] — and Klara as quiet and submissive — Sandgruber says the letters show that “the role that Klara Hitler played in the family is a little different than previously assumed.”
“My wife likes to be active and has the necessary joy and understanding for an economy” Alois wrote in one letter, according to Sandgruber’s translation.

“A substantial part of the purchase price came from her inheritance,” the historian said of the farmhouse. “She was a co-owner and she appears in the letters as an independently acting housekeeper. She goes to the bank and the post office, she directs the house staff, she helps slaughter the pigs and so on.”

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Historian Roman Sandgruber holds a letter written by Alois Hitler to Joseph Radlegger.

But it’s the relationship between father and son, particularly the similarities of [impression Alois gives of] how they [he] thinks about the world, that really comes through in the letters, Sandgruber said. Both Hitler men, he said, shared[Alois seems to have had a] supremely high opinion of themselves [himself]— that they were [he was] better and smarter than everyone else around them [him]. [Negative speculation — Sandgruber is assuming something negative about the father and applying it to the son to denigrate him. Basically, he judges from the letters that Alois had a higher opinion of himself than most of the people he came into contact with in his small rural town. The end].

“With the knowledge he had acquired through reading and courses, Alois Hitler felt superior not only to the farmhands and maid-servants and the neighboring farmers, but also to many academics with university degrees,” Sandgruber said.
In the letters, he complains about carpenters unable to build beehives to his design and standards. He complains about notaries and judges and academics. He is satisfied only with knowledge that comes from his own personal experiences. He finds bourgeois society especially contemptuous.
Yet none of this chest-thumping really brings Alois any success.
A couple of years after taking over the farm, everything fell apart and the family was forced to move. Meanwhile, as Alois took to regularly beating Adolf, the son still modeled his father’s way of thinking and being, all the while soaking up the general anti-Semitism* building in the region. [*There was no “anti-Semitism building in the region”. This is a rather typical Jewish journalist’s retro-active deceit, seeking to end the article with Jews as eternal innocent victims of prejudice.]

...In examining the letters, which will be exhibited in an Austrian museum next month, Sandgruber noticed something even more eerie.
Their signatures were nearly impossible to distinguish from each other. [Another sensationalist journalist deceit to end with. The signatures are definitely very similar but it is easy to distinguish them.]

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Signature of Alois Hitler

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Signature of Adolf Hitler
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Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

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Very interesting. Thanks for posting, b-t!

:)
Kitty Hart-Moxon (1998): "Believe me, I came into Auschwitz in a much worse condition than I actually left it."

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Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

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Charles Traynor wrote:
Tue Mar 30, 2021 5:41 pm
Very interesting. Thanks for posting, b-t!
:)
👍👍🏼
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
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Re: Aspects of Hitler's personal life

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.
ADOLF HITLER’S
PATERNAL GRANDFATHER

There is an old and deliberately deceitful allegation that is still going around on the internet, about the identity of Adolf Hitler’s paternal grandfather. This deceit was instigated as part of a misinformation campaign to embarrass Adolf once he came to political prominence in the 1920’s.
Though it still is circulated by ignorant people, it was investigated and discredited in 1931.

It is based on the fact that we don't know conclusively with absolute certainty who Adolf's paternal grandfather was.

Despite the uncertainty of who exactly his grandfather was we can be reasonably certain of the man’s ethnicity. Because we know that at that time there were was no movement of people such as there is today, and people lived in small communities where everyone knew everyone else. Many people never left their villages and towns their whole lives. The idea that a person of another ethnicity other than Austrian-German could have met and impregnated Maria Anna Schicklgruber and no-one would have noticed is ludicrous. Only an ignorant or a dishonest person would deny this truth.

Anyone who does even a modicum of serious research will discover that Johann Nepomuk Hiedler — who also spelt his name as Hüttler and later Hitler— was almost certainly Adolf Hitler's biological paternal-grandfather, as he raised Alois as his own son, was present as an official witnesswhen Alois aged 39 had himself legitimised in the Church register as Alois Hitler, and in his will left Alois a considerable portion of his life saving as an inheritance.
So, in reality there was not then — nor is now — any great controversy nor mystery about it.

Adolf's paternal grandmother was Maria Anna Schicklgruber. Despite the lies that this discredited but recurring misinformation relies upon, Maria Anna was never a poor housemaid AND she did NOT work for ANY wealthy Jewish families, and there has never been provided any information nor even contemporary suspicion of her ever meeting or having sexual intercourse with anyone outside of her own immediate community. This was all invented by Hitler's enemies in the late nineteen-twenties — ninety years later — to try and discredit him.

Here are the basic facts.
Maria Anna, at the age of 26, inherited seventy-four and a quarter gulden at the death of her mother in 1821. By 1838 it had increased to 165 gulden. So by the standards of her time she was not poor.
Her son Alois (Adolf's father) was born in June 1837 when she was 42 years old. At the time of his birth, she was living in the Strones village with a family by the name of Trummelschlager. Mr and Mrs Trummelschlager became the godparents to Alois. So Alois Schicklgruber was born in the hamlet of Strones, parish of Döllersheim, in an area in northwest Lower Austria known as Waldviertel, to a 42-year-old unmarried woman, Maria Schicklgruber, whose family had lived in the area for generations

As she refused to reveal the name of her child’s father, the child was only given her name in the church baptismal register. She didn't marry until 1842 — five years after the birth of her son — to a man named Johann Georg Hiedler, a miller of the village of Spital. Alois' entry in the baptismal register was made at Döllersheim where Johann Georg Hiedler and Maria Anna Schicklgruber were married. If he had been the father of Alois, Maria Anna and Johan Georg would certainly have named him as the father when they married, and thus legitimised their son. But they did not.

Maria died five years after her marriage on the 7th January 1847, aged 53.
Johann Georg Hiedler’s younger brother was Johann Nepomuk Hiedler which he chose to spell as Hüttler.
After Maria's death, her then 10 year old child Alois went to live in his household.
For clarity I will repeat that: Mrs. Maria Anna Heidler’s illegitimate son Alois went to live in the household of his stepfather’s brother — his step-‘uncle’ Johann Nepomuk — five years after her marriage, upon her death.
Think about that!

Johann Georg Hiedler was 50 years old when he married, and 55 when he became a widower. After his wife's death, he presumably did not want responsibility for a young child who was not his but was his younger brother's bastard.
His brother Johann Nepomuk Hüttler had been 35 years old and married at the time Alois was conceived. So he wouldn't have been able to admit his paternity of Alois without upsetting his wife. But now he could have his son Alois as his ‘nephew’ live in his own family home without alienating her.

Illegitimacy wasn't so uncommon then. Alois' own second wife Franziska Matzelsberger had a son born out of wedlock when he married her, and he accepted this son in his household. Illegitimacy was common in lower Austria at that time; in some areas it reached up to 40% and as late as 1903 the figure was 24%. So it was quite common for children to be born out of wedlock and to be legitimised at a later date.

SUMMARY: a delberate falsehood was invented and spread when Adolf Hitler was becoming a rising and popular politician. The aim of this lie was to try and discredit Hitler by suggesting his illegitimate father had been conceived by a 'secret' Jewish parent. It was investigated and discredited. But idiots still like to repeat it. In reality there is absolutely NO evidence of Maria Anna Schicklgruber ever working for a Jewish family in either Graz or Vienna. Not even professional peddlar’s of anti-Hitler mythology like Ian Kershaw accepts this ‘yarn’ of having any credibility. This story of Adolf having an anonymous Jewish grandparent is utter drivel. It is only favoured by people with simple minds or those with malicious intent.

Then concerning Hitler’s nationality: Hitler regarded himself as German. He spoke German as his mother tongue and he saw it as his mission to reunite all German speaking people into one nation. Sure, he was born in Austria, spoke German with an Austrian accent and had Austrian habits, such as of etiquette and politeness. But when people assert that Hitler was an Austrian that is to state the obvious in order to deny the obvious. Prussia, Bavaria, Austria, whatever: these were all Germanic principalities with Germanic populations speaking German. Hitler succeeded temporarily in uniting them into one volk. Certain people didn’t want a powerful, united Germany prospering under the leadership of a courageous person who recognised the way international banking operated. So a war was instigated against him, and he and the unity he achieved was destroyed in the most destructive, mass-murderous, most lied-about war in known human history.
"When people who are honestly mistaken learn the truth,
they either cease being mistaken
or they cease being honest"
-- Anonymous

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